Let me be clear about any potential bias in this article.  I am a Christian and I am a Seahawks fan.  Disclaimer done.

It is very common to athlete to thank God for things.  Whether it is a subtle as a quick point upwards, after a great play, a kneel down and quick prayer in the end zone, or as outward and direct as comments in a press conference… athlete’s have been thanking God since long before the NFL was created.

So Christians take the view that God is mostly hands off of every day life, allowing the chips to fall where they may.  Other Christians take a more hands on view of God that He is active in our daily lives.  I’m not here to debate these two theologies as that would dive deep into a centuries old debate between Calvin and Arminian view points.

Instead, this article is aimed at those people who would attempt to poke fun at these Christian athletes.  In particular is Quarterback Aaron Rodgers after last nights win over the Seahawks.  Although I agree that he is a talented quarterback and perhaps even one of the best in history, his comments last night showed a lack of class not typical from him.  While he did give God credit for the win, this was not said honestly.  Instead it was in jest, making fund of Russell Wilson’s comments about giving God credit for BOTH the wins and losses.  That comment was classless and uncalled for.  Rodgers is better than that.

The most common argument I hear from people who chose to insult those giving credit to God is this.

God has more important things to worry about than a football game.

It is THAT statement I wish to take aim at for the rest of this article.   There are two fundamental flaws in that statement.  Those making the statement show their lack of understanding of God when they say things like this.

  1.  The word WORRY.
    That word is defined as to give way to anxiety or unease; allow one’s mind to dwell on difficulty or troubles.
    God, being eternal, by nature cannot have anxiety about the future, since He knows it.  Whether you take the Arminian view that He is fully aware of what’s coming or the Calvinist view that He is the one steering the ship, either way, God cannot worry.
  2. The issue of MORE IMPORTANT THINGS
    This part of the argument actually has TWO flaws.

    1. Who are we to claim was is important?
      It’s always amazing how seemingly little things can end up having a huge impact.  The proverbial “straw that breaks the camel’s back”.  For example, I met a person that was ordering coffee before going to work one Tuesday morning.  The order got messed up and had to be fixed, then after getting his coffee right, a friend called to add to the order.  He got back in line.  This seemingly non-event of a coffee order mistake cost him 10 minutes.  But those 10 minutes on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, saved his life.
    2. Who are we to limit God?
      We’re talking about a God that simply said “Let their be light” (Gen 1:3) and instantly Billions of star systems came into existence (what some call the Big Bang).
      Yet this same God took time to “formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb” (Psalm 139:13).
      This is a God where NOTHING is too large or important but at the same time NOTHING is too small or insignificant.

So whether or not you care if God takes times to influence a football game is absolutely NOT the point of this article.  I have two simple points from all of this.

  1. God cares enough to have His Son die for our sins… he just might care enough about our daily lives too.
  2. If you don’t believe that, don’t have such low class as to insult someone who does.

Go Hawks!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s